Digital Canvas Interviews Bleed FX

A few weeks ago, we included the thrilling Coors Light – Freeze the World spot by Bleed VFX in our World Cup Featured Collection. We love everything about this piece from concept to execution and were excited to get a chance to speak with Bleed VFX about their work on this piece. 

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
The World Cup is nearing completion, and we have seen a number of great commercials which means theoretically there may have been some competition getting this job.  Did you have to pitch for this?  Did the client come to you with the general idea, or was this something you conceptualized from the ground up? 

Bleed VFX:
The thing is, this is a follow up of a TVC we did last year, so we didn’t have to pitch in a creative or technical sense. Not sure if there were other options, though, we like to think we were the only ones Bromley had in mind after last year’s work! The general idea is from Bromley, they came up with the “harder, better, faster” version of part 1 and we worked together with director Seba Lopez to create amazing camera moves that would tell the story of a world frozen by passion. Last year we had the fans in a living room, but this year the commercial features fans all over the world.

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
There was quite a bit of live action involved in this spot.  Was Bleed VFX involved in this at all?  If so, how long were the shoot days and how many days total did it take to film the live action parts?

Bleed VFX:
The shooting was done in Argentina and Mexico during 5 days. The production company did a great job finding spots that looked like different cities. Bleed VFX was always there. This was extremely important as the “frozen” shots are a mix between live action and 3d. Paolo Cavalieri supervised the scenes and made sure we got 360 shots of the characters and spaces. It was a detailed job that had to be done in order to get back to the studio and have all the material.

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
How did you go about compositing a cheering crowd into the stands? 

Bleed VFX:
The stadium was empty so we had to fill it in. We had plates (taken on spot) that we distributed together with flags (also some 3d flags), confetti, flashes and etc. This was a thorough job which took weeks, but it was vital to create the passion and it saved the client the hastle (and money!).

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
Are all of the 3D models and elements created from scratch specifically for this job?  

Bleed VFX:
All the models were made from scratch. The technique used was modeling the characters (and necessary elements/spaces) and projecting the shots we had from set. Because of the camera movements this work had to be super detailed, everything had to look 100% realistic. We had a great team of 3d modelers and also quite a few people working on texture and lighting which was crucial for the result.

Simulations are Bleed VFX’s specialization so working on  ice chunks, drops, smoke, etc was one of the most enjoyable parts! Apart from the technical side it really helped to have a good communication with the client and they were great at giving feedbacks. It was a challenge to make it look hot and cold at the same time!

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
I noticed in the breakdown video there seemed to be an enormous amount of very clean geometry.  What was your typical poly count for a scene, and did any of the scenes really bog down while working?  Also, what were render times like?

Bleed VFX:
We divided the scenes and broke them down into specific needs. We had aprox. one team per scene and each one was carefully chosen for their strength. Close-ups for instance demanded a high level of attention of course, but the scenes which required more time and effort were the ones with complex camera movements like the one in Paris, travelling through tables and chairs. Poly count went between 2.000.000 and 23.000.000 depending on the scene and render time of the final shot took around 10-15 sec per frame. Render farm worked night and day.

Bleed VFX Poly Count

 

DIGITAL CANVAS:
How long did this project take, from award to delivery and how large was the team involved?

Bleed VFX:
We first heard about the project around Christmas. Award was pretty fast and everyone was super eager to start. But being an ambitious project lots of arrangements had be done. So while the production company organized the shooting (lots of locations, casting, etc) we started working on the previz. This was the point when the cameras were pre-approved and only small tweaks were done afterwards. Initially we had 4 months but the World Cup doesn’t wait so we had to do all the postproduction in 2 months. It was crazy and we had to make sure everything was done on time no matter what. For composition we had a team dedicated to the stadium shots, another one to all the matte painting needed to create Tokyo and Paris. We had aproximately 20 modelers, and some of them worked  in shading, texture and lighting too. Simulations were done simultaniously and then composition and rendering of the final scenes was done as soon as possible. Of course not everyone worked during the same span but all in all around 40 people worked on this 1 minute long commercial.

 

See the finished piece:
Agency: Bromley
Production: Shooters Films USA
Director: Seba Lopez

Posted by: dceditors